Emerging Professionals

AIA Palm Beach is playing a leadership role in empowering the next generation through learning and responding to their needs; providing University outreach; providing high school student outreach; identifying qualified candidates for scholarships; encouraging and supporting architecture students in their academic endeavors; and sharing AIAS direction and leadership.


 AIA Palm Beach offers a dues assistance grant to associate members. Click HERE for an application. Newly licensed architects may also submit for a dues reimbursement funded by AIA Palm Beach by clicking HERE.


The 2018-2019 Payette Sho-Ping Chin Memorial Academic Scholarship is accepting applications. We’re looking for strong candidates and eager to spread the word. Sho-Ping was a fierce advocate for healthcare design for every population and we’re honored to carry on her legacy with this program. Thanks!

 

Payette and Architects Foundation
Launch 2018-2019 Payette Sho-Ping Chin Memorial Academic Scholarship Program

Annual Scholarship Program Opens 2018-2019 Call for Entries

In partnership with the Architects Foundation, Payette today announced the opening of applications for the Payette Sho-Ping Chin Memorial Academic Scholarship. This $10,000 scholarship provides assistance to women pursuing a professional degree in architecture recognized by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).

Beginning today through January 17, 2018, qualified students entering at least their third year of undergraduate, or any level of graduate study, are encouraged to apply. Previous Payette Sho-Ping Chin Memorial Academic Scholarship recipients are also eligible to reapply.

“We are so pleased to partner with Payette on this scholarship,” said Marci B. Reed, Executive Director of the Architects Foundation. “In addition to being a long-time principal at Payette, Sho-Ping Chin was instrumental in defining the national discourse for women in design, and helped found the AIA Women’s Leadership Summit. This scholarship is a wonderful way to honor her memory.”

Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and will be required to provide their resume, a personal essay, 5-10 examples of their creative work, and two letters of recommendation, among other requirements. To apply, visit http://www.architectsfoundation.org/scholarships.

“Sho-Ping was a wonderful mentor and instilled in her teams a sense of camaraderie and commitment to design,” said Kevin Sullivan, Payette’s President and long-time colleague of Sho-Ping. “The impact of her work at our firm and throughout the profession is still felt today. We are honored to continue her legacy and commitment to advancing women in architecture through this scholarship.”

Scholarship winners will be notified in April 2018. To learn more about the Payette Sho-Ping Chin Memorial Academic Scholarship program and how to apply please visit https://architectsfoundation.org/.

This is the first scholarship offered through the Architects Foundation specifically for women architecture students, named after a woman architect.

About Payette

Payette is a leading architectural design firm in Boston, MA specializing in the programming, planning, and design of complex buildings for medical and scientific research, academic teaching, and healthcare. For more than three quarters of a century, Payette has practiced innovation in these highly technical buildings while developing a culture based on deep readings of program as one of the essential subtexts of architecture. This thorough understanding of how hospitals and laboratories work has helped clients transcend function to transform places and improve people’s lives. For more information, please visit www.payette.com.

About The Architects Foundation

The Architects Foundation was created to celebrate architecture’s value by advancing tomorrow’s design leaders and preserving architectural treasures of the past. The Architects Foundation is positioning itself for new success, preparing to launch a momentous increase in scholarship programming, thanks to a recent gift of $1 million from AIA. By enhancing the program, the Foundation aims to attract and cultivate a diverse next generation of architects, and provide new opportunities to support the evolution of the profession. The Architects Foundation also preserves the historic Octagon building in the nation’s capital, seeking ways to best express the values of historic preservation work and keep the Octagon’s legacy alive with exhibits, educational programs and partnerships. Visit https://architectsfoundation.org/.


 

ARE 5.0 Resources

NCARB has created a number of study tools and resources to help candidates prepare for ARE 5.0, including:

 

ARE 5.0 Video Prep Series

ARE 5.0 Video Prep Series—These videos explain each division, walk through sample questions, and explore the new exam format.

 

ARE 5.0 Demo and Testing Strategies

ARE 5.0 Demonstration Exam—Available for free in My NCARB, the Demo Exam lets candidates explore the exam interface and practice using the new item types.

 

ARE 5.0 Community—Candidates can get help from NCARB experts, share testing tips, and find local study groups on the new community.

 

ARE 5.0 Handbook—This document includes a breakdown of each division, sample questions, helpful formulas, common abbreviations, and more.

 

ARE 5.0 Guidelines

ARE 5.0 Guidelines—The guidelines provide details on scheduling appointment times, what to expect at the test center, receiving your score, and more.


ARE 5.0 Launches November 1

 Ready to transition to the Architect Registration Examination®(ARE®) 5.0?
Mark your calendars for November 1, 2016, the official launch date of the updated exam. The six-division exam will include case studies that simulate real-world practice, incorporate new testing technologies, and feature a format that more closely aligns with modern practice.

Once the exam launches on November 1, you can:

  • Log in to My NCARB and self-transition your eligibilities to ARE 5.0
  • Make an appointment to take an ARE 5.0 division

  • In the meantime, here’s how you can prepare for ARE 5.0:

  • Learn more about the new division structure with our in-depth blog series
  • Explore the new question types and case studies that will be featured on the new exam
  • Stay tuned for the late summer release of the ARE 5.0 Guidelines and a new ARE 5.0 Handbook that will help you prepare for each division of ARE 5.0, as well as other helpful exam resources
  • Use our interactive Transition Calculator to figure out which testing strategy best fits your current situation

  • We’ll continue to administer ARE 4.0 until June 30, 2018. This 20-month period of dual delivery will enable you to finish the exam in a way that best suits your needs.

    Still have questions? Visit ncarb.org/ARE5 to learn more about ARE 5.0.



The name may be different, but the goal is the same: on June 29, 2016, NCARB’s training program was updated to reflect six broad areas of architectural practice—and renamed the Architectural Experience Program® (AXP®).
We’re sure you have questions about the launch, and we have answers. Here’s how you can learn more about the new AXP.
AXP Resources
The new AXP Guidelines contain all the information you need to complete the AXP, including instructions on creating and navigating your NCARB Record, tasks and opportunities for each experience area and setting, and details on training requirements.
The My AXP mobile app makes logging hours and submitting reports easier than ever. The latest version reflects the new AXP requirements of 3,740 hours under six experience areas. My AXP is now available for Apple and Android devices.
Review Your Record
Log in to your NCARB Record to see how the hours you reported under the previous program merged into the six new experience areas. Take this opportunity to meet with your supervisor and make a plan to complete the AXP!

AXP Launches June 29, 2016
On June 29, 2016, the Intern Development Program (IDP) will be updated to reflect six broad areas of current architectural practice—and renamed the Architectural Experience Program (AXP). Here’s what you need to know to prepare for the upcoming changes.
What’s Happening?
The program’s current 17 experience areas will be realigned into six areas to ensure you get the training you need to practice independently. The six new experience areas are:
  • Practice Management
  • Project Management
  • Programming & Analysis
  • Project Planning & Design
  • Project Development & Documentation
  • Construction & Evaluation
The AXP will also feature a new e-Portfolio option. Through this alternative, eligible design professionals with comprehensive experience beyond five years will have an opportunity to satisfy the AXP’s experience requirements through an online portfolio.
What Tools Are Available
To plan how you’ll earn those hours going forward, we’ve prepared the Experience Area Map to show how the 17 current experience areas will merge into the six new areas. Keep in mind that it’s a good idea to continue reporting any extra hours that exceed AXP’s requirements, since some jurisdictions have additional experience requirements.  
You can also use our interactive IDP Experience Calculator to explore how your existing recorded hours will transfer after the launch of AXP.
Important: A handful of jurisdictions require 5,600+ hours and/or have a minimum employment duration requirement. Take the time to check with NCARB or your jurisdiction for the latest rules and regulations.
How Will This Impact You?
If you haven’t completed the IDP by June 29, you’ll be automatically transitioned into the new AXP, and the program will still require 3,740 total hours. Plus, all the required hours you’ve already reported will be allocated to one of the six new areas, so you won’t lose any hours.
The AXP will have two experience settings: Setting A: Practice of Architecture and Setting O: Other Experiences. A number of existing supplemental experience opportunities that currently fall under Setting S—including site visits, design competitions, and the Professional Conduct Monograph—will be incorporated into Setting O. However, a few opportunities will no longer be eligible after the update, so you should take the opportunity to report any supplemental experience by June 28. Learn more about the new experience settings.
What’s Next?
We will continue to share updates with you as we get closer to the launch date, so be on the lookout for blog articles, social media updates, and more. In the meantime, take the opportunity to meet with your supervisor and make a plan to complete your experience requirement in the new AXP.
Questions? We’re always here to help!
Call customer service at 202/879-0520.



 

Updates to this edition of the ARE Guidelines include: 

  • Page 12: Several personal items related to medical conditions that used to require a testing accommodation are now preapproved to be brought into the testing room. If you require additional accommodations or need to bring other personal items into the testing room, the testing accommodations procedure outlined within the ARE Guidelines must be followed.
  • Page 13: Time allocated for each test section of the ARE remains the same. However, the previously listed 15-minute intro times have been removed from the table, as intro times now vary based on the amount of information the candidate needs to review during each section. This change serves as a reminder that the various intro times of the exam administration are not to be used for any other purpose than to complete the necessary on-screen activities.

    To ensure fair and consistent testing standards are applied to all candidates, all work related to testing should be completed during the given testing time and should not be done during the introductory screen times. Using a candidate-created layout tool or writing notes from memory on the provided scratch paper is acceptable while testing, but must be completed during the testing time and not beforehand. Candidates should not attempt to gain an advantage by completing work before the testing time begins. Any work completed before the testing time begins is subject to confiscation by the test center proctor, and such efforts could result in disciplinary action under the policy for testing irregularities.
  • Page 19: Updated the ARE Candidate Agreement language to reflect the new policy in place as of July 1, 2015.

 Download the ARE Guidelines

AIA Continuing Education and your IDP hours

Interns, whether or not employed in a qualified experience setting, may earn elective hours by completing all AIA Palm Beach programs which have been approved for continuing education.

One AIA learning unit earns one IDP credit hour.

For information on reporting your AIA continuing education requirements, please see page 18 of the  IDP Guidelines .

Understanding and completing IDP is every intern’s responsibility. However, they can’t complete it alone. IDP supervisors and mentors play crucial roles throughout the internship process. Their knowledge, guidance, and support are invaluable to the development of an intern and add to the long-term quality of the profession. It is essential that they understand the requirements and objectives of the IDP in order to help interns complete the program in a timely manner.

An IDP supervisor is the individual who supervises an intern on a daily basis. A supervisor is someone who reviews and directs the work of others and ensures that work is done within acceptable levels of quality. An IDP supervisor is the individual who supervises an intern on a daily basis. The IDP supervisor is required to certify that the information submitted on an experience report is true and correct and that the work was performed in a technically competent manner.

In most experience settings, an IDP supervisor must be a registered architect; however, in certain experience settings an IDP supervisor may be a professional from another discipline. Responsibilities include:

  • Providing reasonable opportunities for an intern to gain adequate experience in each IDP experience area
  • Meeting regularly with an intern to review progress and verify their IDP experience report
  • Encouraging an intern to participate in seminars and other supplemental experience opportunities.

Find an IDP Supervisor


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A mentor is a loyal advisor, teacher, or coach. A mentor is a loyal adviser, teacher, or coach. A mentor should make a long-term commitment to an intern’s professional growth. If possible, the mentor should not work in the same office as the intern, so that the intern can gain useful insight into the daily work experience. A mentor must be an architect; however, the mentor does not need to be registered in the jurisdiction where the intern is located. An intern and mentor should meet periodically to review experience reports submitted for the IDP. A mentor is also a resource for supplemental experience opportunities and can provide guidance to enhance an intern’s professional growth. An intern and mentor should discuss expectations and come to an agreement on such issues as: the length of the relationship; frequency and types of meetings and other activities; and how to give each other feedback. Confidentiality is an absolute must, for both mentor and intern, with regard to personal and professional issues. Refer to www.aia.org for more information about the AIA mentorship program.

Find a Mentor


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Working with an Intern

The purpose of the IDP is to develop competent architects who are prepared to practice architecture independently upon initial registration. For more information about working with an intern, please click here. 

ARE candidates who are ready to start taking exams are invited to participate in group study sessions designed to help members pass the seven sections of the ARE in seven months. Resources will include seminars on each topic, the use of a lending library, and expertise shared by experienced architects. For more information, please contact director@aiapalmbeach.org.